That's a very big fringe
Posted by aogThursday, 12 August 2010 at 07:42 TrackBack Ping URL

Via Hot Air we have Rasmussen reporting that a majority of likely voters consider the current Democratic Party agenda “extreme”. I suppose we’ll see at the ballot box in November.

P.S. Could it be things like this that are contributing to this view? Or maybe this kind of play on racial fears and group identity. Apparently the meme that it’s the Tea Party that should be watched is foundering on the rocks of reality.

The American public has a more positive view of the Tea Party movement than both leaders of the majority party in Congress, according to a poll released Wednesday. [source]

Now that’s a fringe.

Comments — Formatting by Textile
AVeryRoughRoadAhead Friday, 13 August 2010 at 00:28

The American public has a more positive view of the Tea Party movement than both leaders of the majority party in Congress…

An NBC/Wall Street Journal poll has the Tea Party whippin’ up on Sen. Harry Reid, 30% - 11%; but meanwhile, Rasmussen has Reid and Angle in a dead heat.

So apparently the Tea Party movement is having extreme difficulty Transmogrifying good will into actual support - not surprisingly.

Annoying Old Guy Friday, 13 August 2010 at 08:23

That a candidate can effectively come out of nowhere and get in a dead heat with the Senate Majority leader? That seems like quite a good translation of good will to support. Or Senator Scott Brown. Or the end of Senator Bill Bennett. Or Rand Paul pulling ahead. Or is your view that if any Tea Party backed candidate doesn’t win, that invalidates support for the entire movement?

I would also note that I think there’s just a little bit of space between “fringe” and “dominant political party”.

AVeryRoughRoadAhead Friday, 13 August 2010 at 17:24

That a candidate can effectively come out of nowhere and get in a dead heat with the Senate Majority leader?

A Senate Majority Leader who’s despised nationally and unbeloved locally… Any GOP nominee opposing Reid would have to be as inept as Jack Ryan, Alan Keyes or Ben Quayle to not be contesting strongly.

Alls I’m sayin’ is, national polls are one thing, actual local politickin’ & winnin’ are another altogether. As you note, I suppose we’ll see at the ballot box in November.

AVeryRoughRoadAhead Friday, 13 August 2010 at 17:41

Also, Angle didn’t exactly “come out of nowhere” - she just wasn’t nationally known. She’s been a minor force in Nevada politics for over a decade, with a “Ron Paul crossed with Sarah Palin” style.

AVeryRoughRoadAhead Friday, 13 August 2010 at 17:41

Also, Angle didn’t exactly “come out of nowhere” - she just wasn’t nationally known. She’s been a minor force in Nevada politics for over a decade, with a “Ron Paul crossed with Sarah Palin” style.

Annoying Old Guy Friday, 13 August 2010 at 17:49

Angle isn’t the only Tea Party based candidacy. You could go back and read my previous comment for some other examples.

pj Saturday, 14 August 2010 at 14:32

AVRRA - “None of the above” always does better than an unpopular politician; that’s what “Tea Party” is, and what “Barack Obama” was in 2008. A specific named individual with specific views, not necessarily well known by the electorate, is always going to poll worse until voters get to know them.

We shall see how things go. I think it’s fair to say that the Tea Party is mobilizing 30% of the electorate, and will increase turnout and activism for conservatives. In Scott Brown’s race, there was tremendous grassroots volunteer activity that carried him over the finish line. Many Tea Party candidates will get similar help this November.

Post a comment