But this one says "green" …
Posted by aogWednesday, 20 December 2006 at 17:44 TrackBack Ping URL

While I was shopping on line for Christmas,I bought various items from a “green” company that sells putatively ecologically friendly consumer goods. For instance, this neat little gadget. I gave one out for Christmas and am waiting to hear back on whether it actually works. There’s no law of physics violation, so it’s possible.

On the other hand, I also ordered some rechargable batteries, even though I am not convinced they are really more ecologically friendly because they fail so often. These, however, despite being marketed as “green”, came in quite the layered non-biodegradable wrapping. Plastic outer box, plastic inner covering, plastic back plate, tape, etc. It just seems the perfect example of Logo-Realism, where labeling is what matters, not the actual impact on the environment. Still, I will see if these batteries have a longer lifespan than other varieties I have used.

Comments — Formatting by Textile
Michael Herdegen Friday, 22 December 2006 at 09:31

Your neat little gadget seems overpriced to me, but it should work like a charm. “Work”, that is, in a technical sense; I wonder whether the user will be able to perceive the difference.

Annoying Old Guy Friday, 22 December 2006 at 10:08

I got it on sale, but even so it was my curiousity that did me in. It’s one of those things that sounds fine in theory but one is left wondering, as you do, whether there’s any real effect.

cjm Friday, 22 December 2006 at 14:24

wouldn’t a little deflector over the top of the stove achieve the same effect, with greater efficiency ?

once i cash out of socal, i am going to get a house with land, so i can start playing around with power self-sufficiency (amongst other things). distributed power gen is the next big thing.

Annoying Old Guy Friday, 22 December 2006 at 16:09

I don’t think it have as much effect, but I think it would likely have a lower cost to benefit ratio but it wouldn’t be nearly as nifty. Also, one thing the fan does is explicitly draw in cold air from the room in addition to moving hot air around. The lack of requirement for batteries and auto-shut off is neat as well. A sort of implementation of your concept is putting bends in the exhaust pipe to provide a greater heating surface for warming the room.

But your comment reminds me of those fireplace log holders that were supposed to boost heating. Basically they just had hollow tubes for the supports with both ends extending out toward the room further than normal. The theory was that cold air would be draw in to the bottom of the tubes, be heated, and then flow out of the tops back in to the room. I need to see if I can find one of those, because we actually have a fire place.

Michael Herdegen Friday, 22 December 2006 at 16:27

A sort of implementation of your concept is putting bends in the exhaust pipe to provide a greater heating surface for warming the room.

Saints preserve us, you’d have to be desperate to do that with a woodstove - you’d have to clean out the accumulated soot like EVERY DAY. I’d much rather split wood than disassemble and clean stovepipe, but of course that choice assumes that fuel is plentiful and affordable.

Annoying Old Guy Friday, 22 December 2006 at 16:41

I would think that would only happen if the bend tilted back. I couldn’t find much information, but this FAQ seems to indicate that horizontal sections aren’t a big problem.

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